It’s Not A Pan, It’s An Heirloom

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When we started talking about the food of the South for Taste the South, there were a lot of conversations about not just the food itself, but how the food was made. Which eventually lead to what the food was made in, and more specifically cast iron pans that were handed down from moms and grandmas, and how there is just something different from new cast iron pans you find at stores today. ...

Charleston based Isaac Morton started Smithey Ironware Company because he noticed the same thing, the extra smooth surfaces and timeless logos of vintage ironware were missing in modern day cast iron pans. After years of studying collector’s books and bird-dogging rusty old pieces to restore to their 1890’s glory, the prospect of creating something new piqued his curiosity. Creating and sharing a cast iron cookware line that honored the classic style of vintage pieces, but also harnessed modern technology and processes, just felt like a good idea.

And personally speaking, I am so glad he did, because these pans are the best cast iron pan I have ever cooked with. For starters the finish on the pan is nearly as smooth as glass, on their website, Issac refers to the surface as a, “natural non-stick surface out-of-the-box.” This makes it easy to use, even for eggs and other temperamental items, and a dream to clean up. Completely made in the USA, the process to create each and every pan starts at a small foundry in Indiana, then they arrive in Charleston still porous and grainy. Morton mills the heavy burrs off the metal before grinding and polishing the surface and tumbling each pan in a tub full of rocks to achieve that vintage smoothness. Finally, he seasons it with a thin layer of oil for the non-stick surface.

Isaac has already gotten Smitheys in the hands of some pretty big name chefs, who’ve quickly become fan of the skillets. Sean Brock of famed Charleston restaurant Husk, Hugh Acheson, and one of our favorite Southern food writers Virginia Willis.

We are the only retailer in Texas selling Smithey and have a limited quantity of the two sizes, 10-inch for $159.99 and 12-inch for $199.99, during Taste the South.

I have a feeling if you take one of these heirloom quality pans home, not only will you Taste the South, but also history, craftsmanship, and memories to come.

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